PFW: ROLAND MOURET F/W 2016

Roland Mouret F/W 2016
Roland Mouret F/W 2016

This may be the shortest review I write all season. Roland Mouret’s fall/winter collection can be summed up with the elements: honeycomb, crushed velvet, and art deco. As a basic synopsis, I could stop right there and have told you everything crucial one needs to know about this collection. Thre’s not one of the 38 looks that does not incorporate at least one of those elements, and several pieces make use of all three. The best news of all: none of it looks staid, stodgy, or stereotypical. Looks are fresh, attractive, and wearable without being blatant copies of everything else we’ve seen on every other catwalk. Mouret has created a collection well worth examining.

If I stop here, though, you might miss the fact that the first several instances of the honeycomb are done as lace. The hexagonal pattern almost looks like polka dots when first seen in sleeves but becomes more obvious, with smaller patterns inside, as it moves to the bodice. The play back and forth between the honeycomb and the art deco shapes not only provide contrast in texture but gives a distinct feeling of layering without actually adding bulk.

If I end the review here, I can’t tell you how Mouret uses the art deco shapes to work along the feminine tailoring around waist and hips, blending curves of one art form with those of another. Mouret really pulls out the feminine personality of art deco and does so with such beauty as one might wonder why we’ve not seen more of this type of shaping in the past 70+ years. While Mouret makes use of the shapes, however, he doesn’t go so far as to give the pieces a strict architectural look. He keeps the lines soft and fluid, rather like wine-colored honey.

There are also some floral prints and a gradient vertical stripe pattern that runs from dark to light. There are some coats that are sufficiently cute and Mouret’s use of sheer is sophisticated and stylish without going “too far” toward more aggressive sexuality. The colors stay with dark jewel tones, the blood red burgundy being the better look of the group.

A lot of words are not required to describe this Roland Mouret collection, so this review gets to be a short one. However, you will want to spend a fair amount of time looking over the different pieces. Mouret is quite creative in his approach and every  piece has a unique personality worth  the time to consider. You’re almost certain to enjoy what you see.

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