PFW: ANTHONY VACCARELLO S/S 2016

Anthony Vaccarello S/S16
Anthony Vaccarello S/S16

Fashion attention has moved to Paris today, sort of. Actually, most people are just getting settled in, scoping out cafèsnear the venues, and getting their bearings in a city that hasn’t changed for centuries but is never the same as the last time you were here. The morning started off cool and there were leather and suede jackets to be seen on almost everyone, reminding us that, even though we’re looking at spring/summer fashion, autumn is what’s moving in quickly. A brisk breeze as evening began to set in kept paces lively. There are times when dressing fashionably isn’t quite comfortable for the weather. This is one of those times.

Paris is typically slow about getting started. After all, their “week” last ten days; there’s plenty of time to pay attention to fashion.  Who really cares about missing a show or two. So, when The Row showed earlier this afternoon, neither Vogue nor Marie Claire, nor any number of other fashion magazines bothered covering it. The twins didn’t even get a spot on the official schedule. Most the seats were filled last minute by fans and bloggers who were just excited to be there.

Anthony Vaccarello is, however, a first-day requirement. French Vogue editor Emanuelle Alt arrived early, as she tends to do, and the hall, with floor-to-ceiling windows providing a beautiful view of the city, filled quickly. Vaccarello’s clothes tend to not change too terribly dramatically from year to year. We know to expect looks to show off models’ legs, and we expect there to be larger amounts of leather and denim. There was plenty of both again this season, though the jackets tended to have more of a modified military look to them. He also kept the dramatically asymmetrical look he started last year, and even expanded upon it some, making some tops almost feel a bit lopsided.

What really stands out this season is the prints, especially the sepia faces in large halftone dots. They’re probably most appropriate on the blouses, but they capture everyone’s attention on white stretch cotton dresses with slits all the way up to the waist. Dramatic is an apt description. There’s also a light blue floral print on a set of white cotton button down shirts that is quite nice. The most noticeable of these doesn’t actually have buttons, though. The designer carries over the circle motif from last season, sparingly, and uses it as the fastening point on the shirt. This leaves the neckline open on a diagonal slant and has the effect of a cutout at the waist. How one gets in or out of the thing likely requires some practice, though.

All in all, though, there are no dramatic surprises here. Vaccarello stays well within his established aesthetic, just enough new stuff to be different from last year, but nothing out-of-bounds or over-the-top by any stretch of the imagination. This is a nice, quiet, visually predictable start to Paris Fashion Week. There will be absurdity to come, I’m sure, but for now just enjoy the ambience of Paris.

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