LFW: SIMONE ROCHA S/S 2014

It can’t be easy growing up in the shadow of a designer like John Rocha. Most children might flee the whole fashion scene as quickly as possible. Yet, Rocha’s daughter Simone not only followed in her father’s footsteps, she made him proud. This morning, John Rocha was all smiles sitting front row for his daughter’s spring/summer 2014 collection. Having been named this season’s NEWGEN designer, Simone enjoyed the company of several other designers who had also come to offer their congratulations and support.

John Rocha is well known for his use of lace and Simone definitely learned how to manipulate that fabric from her father, but she’s not limited to just that look. Her silhouettes are a little less feminine, more modern, and the jackets are more roomy. While she did use some of the same coated lace we saw in her father’s collection, she also made excellent use of printed plastic, patent cotton, and textured heavy silk. She also used a lot of sheer fabric; lots and lots of sheer fabric. A couple of tops were nothing more than outlines, leaving nothing to the imagination.

What really set the collection off, though, was the finishing touches of pearl. We saw multi-sized beads on blouses and coats, which had a feel of delicateness, and more dominantly on a set of pearl collars that had the audience oohing and ahhing throughout the show. Simone even embellished calf-high stockings with the shiny baubles.

The line inspired by the west coast of Ireland is sometimes reverent, sometimes aggressive, and always confident. Simone finished the show with three brides dressed in veils of tan tulle delicately embellished with even more pearls. The looks were astonishing and is almost certainly a look we will see in bridal magazines this spring.

It is rare to see familial legacies in fashion, but the Rocha family seems set to create a dynasty that will dominate British fashion for many years to come.

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